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Canning without a pressure canner

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Has anyone done this? I used to can with my ex MIL. She has since passed away taking to the grave all the steps she would not let me preform. She never used a pressure canner, she said you didn't have to if you were careful and knew what you were doing. She must have followed her own advice because in 40 yrs she never made a bad batch. I used to help her but only on certain steps so I do not know the whole process...

Is this method common?
Is anyone able to tell me how to do it?

I priced these canning sets and they are all $75 and higher I'm trying to avoid buying one.
post #2 of 29
I don't know much about canning at all. To be honest, I'm not even sure I know what pressure canning is ... But last yr I tried canning a couple of jars w/o an actual canner. I'm pretty sure I used hot jars and had boiled the lids. I put the hot lids on the warm/hot jars and turned them upside down. One jar sealed and was properly "canned" but the other never sealed. I know that's not much help. Hopefully one of the other ladies will have more info for you. Or try googling it.
post #3 of 29
There are many foods that you are able to can without a pressure canner. You can use the Boiling water canner for these. It is basically just a very large pot that you can put a lid on to can in boiling water. High Acid foods do not need the pressure canning. Low acid foods do...such as beans, most veggies. Tomatoes are the exception. You can boil these.
My suggestion is to check out your local library for the "Ball Blue Book Guide to Home Canning..." This book will explain step by step how to do most of the basic recipes. It's a great reference. I bought a few other books, and they just don't live up to this book in my opinion. I did a ton of applesauce last year for learning, so this year should be fun!
post #4 of 29
I have the Blue Ball book and a Kerr canning book. Both of them are older versions. They both offer a ton of explanations. Also older Betty Crocker cookbooks have info on canning and freezing. I only freeze my beans and corn for that reason. I can ALOT and use the water bath method.

allgirls
post #5 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by sahmommyuv3 View Post

High Acid foods do not need the pressure canning. Low acid foods do...such as beans, most veggies. Tomatoes are the exception. You can boil these.

I canned green beans and beets this weekend without a pressure canner - I used the water bath method. They were in there for 1 1/2 hours but it worked.

I bought a huge pot - I don't know what it's called but it's black and has a rack inside with directions for water bath canning. I got it on sale at Trader Horn for $16.99 but regular price was like $20 so it's not too bad. It takes longer to can things but not hard. I put my veggies in the jar, wipe the rim with a damp cloth, put the seal on and the ring, put it in the pot and cover the water over top the lids by about an inch. It all depends on what you are canning as to how long you keep them in. My beans I had in for an hour and a half after it began boiling. My beats only a half hour. It was a lot of fun and my first experience canning by myself. Now I need my dad's help in doing tomatoes but my tomatoes aren't even close to being ready so I have time to prepare.

Good luck!
post #6 of 29
Quoting from the Ohio State University Extension's Fact Sheet:

"Pressure canning is the only safe method for home canning vegetables. Clostridium botulinum is the bacterium that causes botulism food poisoning in low-acid foods, such as vegetables. The bacterial spores are destroyed only when the vegetables are processed in a pressure canner at 240 degrees Fahrenheit (F) for the correct amount of time.

Clostridium botulinum is the bacterium commonly found in vegetables and meats. It is harmless until it finds itself in a moist, low-acid, oxygen-free environment or a partial vacuum. In other words, a sealed jar! Under these conditions, the bacterium can grow and produce toxins dangerous to people and animals. Yes, we have ALL heard about someone's grandmother who canned without a pressure canner and lived to 90. And we all know people who smoked 2 packs a day and lived to 90. But neither is smart to do, and the odds will catch up with most people. You'll literally gambling with your life when you eat low acid foods that were canned using the open water bath, rather than pressure canning method.

Do not process (low acid) vegetables using the boiling water bath because the botulinum bacteria can survive that method.

From http://www.pickyourown.org/pressurecanners.htm

Cheers!
post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike jones View Post

Quoting from the Ohio State University Extension's Fact Sheet:

"Pressure canning is the only safe method for home canning vegetables. Clostridium botulinum is the bacterium that causes botulism food poisoning in low-acid foods, such as vegetables. The bacterial spores are destroyed only when the vegetables are processed in a pressure canner at 240 degrees Fahrenheit (F) for the correct amount of time.

Clostridium botulinum is the bacterium commonly found in vegetables and meats. It is harmless until it finds itself in a moist, low-acid, oxygen-free environment or a partial vacuum. In other words, a sealed jar! Under these conditions, the bacterium can grow and produce toxins dangerous to people and animals. Yes, we have ALL heard about someone's grandmother who canned without a pressure canner and lived to 90. And we all know people who smoked 2 packs a day and lived to 90. But neither is smart to do, and the odds will catch up with most people. You'll literally gambling with your life when you eat low acid foods that were canned using the open water bath, rather than pressure canning method.

Do not process (low acid) vegetables using the boiling water bath because the botulinum bacteria can survive that method.

From Home Pressure Canners: How They Work and Tips to Using Them!

Cheers!

Ok that just bothers me beyond belief that same site show to do water baths. My grandmother, mother, and I have done water baths for years with no problems, I am sorry but if you do veggies, fruits, jams and such in waterbaths according to the books everything will be just fine.
post #8 of 29
As the link said - it's low acid veg and meat that need pressure canning.

On the same lines, very high sugar things don't need pressure canning - many jams etc. Things with a boat load of added acid (vinegar) don't need pressure canning (think pickles).

Middle of the page has a nice list of foods that can be canned in a boiling water bath, and ones that must be pressure canned.

Do I Need to Use a Canner for my jam and other home produce?Â* Why?Â* Answered Here!

I borrowed my neighbors pressure canner last year, and it argued with me nonstop I have since decided to just boil water can, freeze, or dry.

The pickyourown site has a ton of awesome recipes, many of which I've tried.
post #9 of 29
I just use a water bath canner and have never had any problems. Your local library should have books on this subject or your local extension office would also be able to answer your questions.
post #10 of 29

Both my gradmothers and my mom canned green beans in a water bath. I see no harm in doing it this way. Human botulism is a serious but relatively rare disease. The disease is an intoxication caused by extremely potent toxins preformed in foods. The toxin itself is destroyed by normal cooking processes – that is, boiling for a few minutes. Refrigeration temperatures combined with salt content and/or acidic conditions will prevent the growth or formation of the toxin as well. If you are worried about botulism and cannot use a preassure cooker, as is the case with anyone that has a glass stove top, you can always freeze your green beans. If you still want t can them using the water bath there are some things you can do to help. You can rise the acid level in the beans by adding vinegar, lemon juice or you can add absorbic acid.

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